Bounce Rate Revisited: How It Applies To The New Buyer Journey

bounce-rate-marketing-living-edge-road-traveledThere are a lot of differing opinions about bounce rate:  The factor assigned to the duration of an individual’s visit to a particular website. The general consensus is that VERY low or VERY high bounce rates are bad and that optimally, bounce rate targets should be set, based on industry, between 40%-60%. I’m not disputing whether organizations like 21Handshake are right or wrong. I’m simply asking if it’s not time to revisit bounce rate guidelines now that so many functions of business and industry can be segmented into molecule-sized units.    

BOUNCE RATE ASSESSMENT IN A RETAIL SALES ENVIRONMENT

I’m not a fan of shopping.  In fact, I prefer to spend as little time doing it as possible.  When I need something, the first place I look is online—either at branded websites or on Amazon.  If I MUST go to a store to touch or try on something, I know EXACTLY what I’m looking for and make a beeline to that department.  I’ve gone through the selection process before ever leaving home.  All that’s left is FINDING AND PURCHASING THE ITEM  THAT’S IN MY HEAD.

If a bounce rate could be assigned to that shopping experience, what would it be?  70%?  80%? 90?  Based on what you learned about me as a CONSUMER, where would the bounce rate fall on a scale from low to high? How many consumers do you think likely share the same attitude?

A good friend, Nick Westergaard, wrote a BRILLIANT post a few years ago called “The Age of Interruption Is Over“.  It describes the opposite scenario—where a high bounce rate is bad.  More importantly:  What causes it to be bad. How convenient, as holiday shopping season is right around the corner!  In Nick’s post, the only bounce rate is the one in which those mall doors are BOUNCING OFF THE HINGES!  

BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS VERSUS COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

If money were not a concern, how many people prefer to spend time engaging with community members instead of transacting business? In other words, would most people prefer the recreational weekend activities or working in their offices?

The answer is obvious unless you have a career that allows you to work like you’re on vacation.  Here’s the quandary:  The purpose of marketing has always been to distract consumers and keep them in the buying environment/mindset.  Why are so many displays set up in retail environments?  Why are people staffed at mall kiosks handing out “free samples” to anyone who passes by, whether they want them or not?  To DISRUPT consumers.  This contradicts the objective of people like me who know what they need and want before they even leave the house—to get in and out as quickly as possible.  Why?  So I can spend MORE time engaging with members of my community that I want to be around.  For many people, this community is our family.

Wouldn’t it make more sense to set bounce rate targets for transactions as high as possible (85% or above) and bounce rates for community engagement targets as LOW as possible (15% or below), with anything in the middle considered NOISE?

LIVING ON THE EDGE

We’re experiencing great change across a multitude of industries. Consumers are making purchase decisions before they ever leave the house, if they ever need to.  Most people say that others they know, like and trust influence their decisions more than branded store personnel. Yet businesses continue to try to influence purchase decisions using distractions to entice and convince consumers to consume.  I get it…that’s how a consumption-driven economy survives and thrives.  On the other hand, streamlining transaction processes (especially automated ones) would accomplish the same outcome.   HIGH bounce rates will reflect the efficiency of those processes.  Conversely, LOW bounce rates would reflect the effectiveness of relevant content stimulating deeper community engagement.  Wouldn’t the integration of these two strategies benefit all parties involved?

A great mentor once said to me:  “If you’re not living on the edge, you’re taking up too much space.”  His wisdom is quite relevant to this post. Many activities in the middle are generating a lot of noise. Breaking through has become extremely challenging, yet many insist on staying the course.

Perhaps it’s time to check the date on that map…

Scaling IoT, AI, and CX

marketing-internet-of-things-ai-scale

There’s a huge degree of inconsistency in the marketing world. Traditional leadership is beginning to see trouble on the horizon.  Instead of opening the windows, they are battening down the hatches.  Check out most corporate leadership profiles on LinkedIn and you will see either nothing at all or 500+ connections, very few of which are OUTSIDE their own organization.  This is a statement, is it not? Unfortunately, the message is: “We don’t know what to do or how to do it.”

Several recent Twitter chats and LinkedIn conversations have turned focus on the Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence, Customer Experience, and Value Propositions.  At the same time, posts about new, up-and-coming social media platforms are diminishing in frequency.  The other day I took a step back (while taking a few steps forward on the treadmill.) “What is the impetus for this transition?”  Why have the conversations about social platforms evolved to IoT and AI?

People are settling into micro-communities (tribes) of other individuals who share complementary worldviews.  In other words, they are at parties with the people they get along with. As a result, the content shock Mark W. Schaefer refers to in his book “The Content Code” is a condition that is intensifying daily, causing random marketing messages designed to get the attention of potential buyers to fade, even get tuned out, because members of those communities are fitting themselves with earbuds.  They are only listening for the messages THEY wish to hear. It’s happening, folks, but where is all of this headed?

A few months back, I consulted a local programming team about designing a Tinder-like professional services matching app.  (No, no , NO…not THAT KIND of professional services!)  The idea was to provide a way for consumers to identify and connect with providers who were more compatible to their worldviews than those who have historically been randomly assigned by lead distribution systems utilized by most organizations.  I’m glad I didn’t waste the four grand…. I think search is going to do this automatically in the near future.  If you’ve got a second, I’ll be happy to explain how what we already have available is possibly going to evolve in a manner that will fulfill this vision, and change marketing forever in the process.

Three months ago, I listened to a “Nobody Likes It Cold” podcast which featured Drew D’Agostino, creator of CrystalKnows.com.  You can catch it here.  Two days later, I subscribed to the platform.  If you are unfamiliar with what Crystal does, you really need to log on and see for yourself.  Allow me to use it as an analogy for how the next few months may very well be a defining period in marketing history.

Crystal has integrated DISC to assess compatibility between individuals, then provides e-mail/communication templates through LI, FB, Twitter, GMail, and Outlook to boost the effectiveness of the exchanges.  It also provides the degree of compatibility between two people.  For example, it told me last week that a person I was considering interacting with shared only a 16% compatibility rating with me, going on to state that we would “have difficulty getting along.”  I didn’t pursue communications with that person.

Now let’s take this Crystal example one step further:  Have you ever used LinkedIn search?  If so, you know that when you search an organization, you also get a list of people, sometimes 1st, 2nd and 3rd-degree connections, inside that organization, right?  (When you look at the screen, the main search page features the company, but there is also a box to the right side of the screen that lists the number of connections you have on the inside.)   Until Crystal arrived on the scene, there was no way of determining the compatibility between the people in those results and the individual searching for information.  But wait:  It gets better…

Monitoring IBM and others in recent Tweet chats indicates an uptick in the development and integration of AI and IoT on the immediate horizon.  I asked a few good influencer friends this week if it was possible for search to utilize AI to assess the overwhelming amount of consumer data in a way that segments individuals into infinite categories (rather than just the 6 or 8 most organizations seem to believe exist). If so, was it then possible to add in an element of IoT, such as wearables, to acquire physiological responses to situations before, during and after the buying process. Finally, if this could actually happen, would the search THEN be able to match that consumer to not only a brand but a rep based on compatibility of worldviews, emotional and physiological support factors in a way that maximizes the customer experience through this matching process?  Let’s just say I wasn’t told “no”.


Let’s recap, shall we?

First start with LinkedIn search.

Next add Crystal.

Finally, integrate AI and IoT.

Voila!  Customers are matched by search to relevant brands and reps based on ORGANIC content (as Google has been leaning toward for a few years).

Here’s the kicker:  Reps and brands who have been inactive or who are doing it wrong are deemed irrelevant…   Or worse…

Invisible.

Confidence In Relationships

ConfidenceWouldn’t it be nice if yours was the last sales call anyone ever wanted to accept?   Wouldn’t it be great if your customers could really MEAN IT when they told the interrupter: “I’ve got everything taken care of?”

The most stand-out characteristic of a successful sales team in the new millennium is that they genuinely care about their customers’ time with friends and family, enjoying experiences that matter more than taking a phone call, reading an e-mail, sorting—not even opening— junk mail or responding to a text. They understand that production numbers are a product of relationships, not the other way around. Build deeper, trusting relationships and earning a decent living will never be a problem.

It would be foolish to think that everyone appreciates this philosophy, or that “those kinds of salespeople” get along with everyone. Comedian Steven Wright once said: “You can’t have everything. Where would you PUT it?” We feel the same way about people: We can’t serve everyone. How would we DO it? No one is so naïve as to think serving everyone is possible, so how do we determine who we are compatible with? Relationships. Getting to know people. Being introduced through mutual connections. Building communities. Generating thoughtful dialogue. Reaching out. Serving.

We aren’t ignorant, either. Change is hard. People on both sides of the table resist it. “But I like the way it’s always been done” is code for “I don’t want to try something new”. When people drive to the car dealership with their worn out trade-in, they KNOW the process. How many would honestly say they LIKE it? Not many. But they know (or think) it’s never going to change, so they deal with it.

Many businesses have done marketing and sales the same way for decades. Prospects used to get calls from telemarketers or door-to-door salespeople offering a variety of products and services several times a week.  Then, on June 27, 2003, the National Do-Not-Call Registry was introduced in the United States. Why? Because people apparently didn’t like being called at home during dinner to be sold something…books, magazines, cookware, vacuums, whatever. What was the result?  You guessed it. All of the calls formerly directed to the people who signed up for DNC were redirected to those who didn’t, exponentially increasing their interruptions.  What was the next public reaction? (Hint: Cell phones.) People began disconnecting their land lines. “You can’t call me if I don’t have a phone number.” Don’t tell me I’m the only one who’s said this out loud. The people spoke with their wire cutters, but instead of reducing the amount of clutter, it resulted in even more of something else: JUNK MAIL.

“If you won’t let me talk to you on the phone, I’ll flood your mailbox. You’ll either call to tell me to stop or buy something so it stops.” The U.S. Postal Service became the distribution network for every mass marketer in the world. What’s your ratio of junk mail to important/personal correspondence on a given day? Mine is about 8:1. Some days I just trash the whole thing after the 5-second review while walking up the driveway. Like many others, I chose years ago to electronically opt-in to anything important:  Bills, newsletters, policy information, etc. Unless it’s a hand-written, personally-addressed card or letter, if it comes on paper its likely irrelevant.

The argument for telemarketing and direct mail has always been that they motivate people to act when they otherwise wouldn’t. If you live with the old mindset and refuse to change, you’re right. You’ve spent years being conditioned with external stimuli that influence every purchase decision you’ve ever made. Seeing a new car ad makes you want and believe you need a new car. Seeing a well-dressed Banana Republic model makes you think your wardrobe needs an upgrade. Getting a 0% offer in the mail makes you think your current rate is too high. All of these stimuli, all of these ads, and all of these interruptions are intensifying daily, yet hardly anyone does anything to stop them. Why is that?

The breaking point is on the horizon. It’s very close to being real. You can hear it in the checkout lines at your local grocery store. What’s your reaction when the person ahead of you in the Express Lane has 20 items instead of the maximum of TEN allowed, then has the audacity to pay with a CHECK?!?!? Odds are your response is something like this: “Are you kidding?!?!? I don’t have time for this!!!!”

Would that have been the response twenty years ago? Possibly. Would the emotion feeding it been as strong? Not likely. But twenty years ago we didn’t have SMARTPHONES or AMAZON or SNAPCHAT. We had attention to spare. Not anymore. What happens when you trap an animal in a corner in a way that increases their stress level (they sense danger)? If it’s a cat, it arches it’s back, hisses, and its claws come out. A dog bares its teeth, growls, and the hair stands up on its back.

The breaking point I’m referring to will generate the same response as the cat and dog, except in people. In our human environment, the danger isn’t physical or spatial…the threat is whatever distracts us from what we truly enjoy doing, namely by questioning the confidence we have in the important decisions we’ve made, both past and present.  So…What are we, as consumers, going to do differently after we scare away the perpetrator?   If we’re not actively reinforcing change in the way the marketing and sales world treats you each day, the perpetrator will always pose a threat to the time we spend enjoying the people, places and things that matter most.

Find a way to say, with confidence, “I’ve got it taken care of.” If you need help making that possible, contact me.  Even if I’m not the right fit, someone in my “know, like and trust network” might be.

Dealing The Cards Face-up

Dealing cards face-up

My wife and I enjoy getting together with other couples to play cards once in a while.  It’s a way to give the brain a workout while also having a good conversation with friends.  One of the husbands, in particular, always insists on cutting the cards after shuffling them.  Apparently you’re less likely to be dealt two bad hands in a row if you mix them up really well.  That made me think:  What if the same concept were applied to the business world?

The traditional marketing model is like the standard card game:  Each player is dealt cards, face-down, from the top of queue (otherwise known as the deck.)  Most games require that the cards remain face-down and out of their opponents’ sight throughout each round of play.  Players have little or no control over the hand they receive, nor do they know what cards their opponents possess.  Sounds like the traditional marketing funnel:   A large number of faceless “leads” are distributed randomly to players who then arrange their hands in a way that makes sense according to the game they are playing.  Just as different cards have different values or significance, different leads may require unique approaches based on their position in the buying journey.  In addition, players are rarely given the opportunity to openly trade cards with one another.  That’s probably where the old saying:  “You need to play the hand you’re dealt” comes from.  The problem with this system is that there are more losers than there need to be. Not everyone wants to play the same game and some cards have more value in one game versus another.  What if this could somehow be changed?  What if the cards could be dealt face-up and were matched to each specific game?  

Personal branding and content marketing are beginning to enable this process of shuffling and face-up re-dealing.

As more and more people tell their stories online, both representatives AND customers are finding it easier to align with those of complementary beliefs and values (or separate themselves from those with conflicting world views). Such re-shuffling is likely disconcerting for “territorial” traditional representatives who see the number of products or services they have sold their customers as the definition of relationship depth, but in the end the process will prove to be quite beneficial to brands, specifically as it relates to retention.  Using the analogy of the card games, some representatives prefer to play Poker while others may prefer to play Cribbage.  Both games use cards, but the rules of each game are different, as are the assigned point values.  For instance, the perfect hand in Cribbage is J (knobs)-5-5-5-5, while the perfect hand in poker is A-K-Q-J-10 (all same suit = Royal Flush).  The Crazy-8’s game I used to play with my grandpa has a different “perfect hand”.  Pitch has yet another.

The point is this:  If representatives are playing different games within the scope of one brand, wouldn’t it be advantageous to the brand’s retention AND acquisition rates to encourage redistributing the cards face-up based on what the best fit for each CARD is rather than only requiring one game to be played?  The greater the variety of games (differentiation between personal brands), the more cards (customers) could be perfectly aligned with each.

We Are Your Customers: Experience Evolution

customer-experience-customers-evolution-changeCustomers want seamless experiences, especially if purchases are mandated by lending institutions and/or law enforcement.  

If we have to make mandatory purchases, fine. But once we’ve signed up, we don’t want to discuss it again unless the prices we’re being charged increase for no apparent reason.  Then we want to know why—immediately.

If we choose to buy products and services from you, we want to do it when it’s convenient for US.  And if we buy online, we want the same price we were quoted when the items are actually delivered. If your systems can’t make that happen, we’ll find a company that can.   

If we need something more than what we’ve already purchased, the people who will help us understand that are our relatives, friends, and co-workers…not a commissioned salesperson who sends 1000 mailers a month or expects us to “come in for an appointment between the hours of 9 and 5.”  We have a jobs, families, and social lives:   Just like you.    

Speaking of expertise, why should a customer have to call your office every time they have a question?  Why can’t you just tell them in simple language how to use what they’ve purchased?  Better yet, why don’t you post podcasts or video links on a blog or website?  Then, even if it’s 10 pm we can find the answer instead of thinking about it all night.  Customers do have smartphones, you know!  

As for additional purchases:  We prefer to research most things on our own.  When we have a good understanding of their features and benefits, we’ll narrow down our options.  Again, our friends and family bring things up because they’re concerned about us, but we’re not always in a financial position to do something at the moment.  If we trust that you understand and respect our choices, we’ll actually look forward to having you help us put it all together when we’re ready.  It’s not like we WANT to be in that position…  We’ve just been forced to adjust a few priorities.     

If we’re looking for a new company, we’ll ask friends and family what their costs are and how well they like their provider/representative.  Then we’ll do research within our own networked communities.  If they’re connected to someone we know, we’ll be more comfortable asking for an introduction.  

Researching you online means you need to BE online. And if we contact you for help, you’d better respond if you expect us to EVER talk to you again. If you’re not where we want you to be, you don’t exist.  We’re not going to waste any personal time looking for you.   

What are we looking for in a brand representative, anyway?  Well, if we share complementary world views and you’re empathetic to everything we just laid out, most of us prefer to have a personal (human) relationship. We’ll even add your number to our contacts as long as we can trust that the only reason you would contact us is to share something you think we’d find interesting or helpful.  On the other hand,  if you refuse to accept our way of doing things and don’t meet us halfway on some of these requests, we’re fine with getting our stuff online, even if it means we’re working with chat bots driven by artificial intelligence.  

The choice is yours.

Marketing and Gambling: Synonyms?

Vegas

Have you ever been to a casino?  Flashing lights, poker tables, slot machines, craps, keno, blackjack, you name it…Most people go in with hopes of winning it big and come out with empty pockets.  It’s just how the system works.  

I worked for a man about 20 years ago that loved to gamble. He maintained a “fund” of about $4000 in the glovebox of his car and frequented the local casinos every weekend.  For him, feeding the $100 slots was a recreational activity.  To me, it seemed ludicrous that he was “burning Benjamins” on an activity in which the odds were NEVER in his favor.  Perhaps it’s the way I was raised or the way I chose the activities to place my own bets on that formed my opinions about his behavior.  It may have even formed a few professional opinions like this one:  Most marketing is like gambling with house money.  

If gambling is defined as “playing games of chance for money”, isn’t that what direct mail is?  A business owner purchases a list of leads and downloads them into a prospecting platform.   Not necessarily a CRM platform, as “CR” stands for “Customer Relationship”:  In the initial stage of this game, there is no relationship.  Following the definition, the names and addresses on the lists are acquired to have a CHANCE at generating enough revenue to RETURN the money to the house.  For example, let’s say a list of 50 names and addresses is purchased for $100.  That’s $2 per name, all of which are random.  The GAMBLE is whether any prospect on the list will result in a sale.  This is equivalent to pulling the arm of the $100 slot machine.  Keep in mind that the average success rate for a direct mail program is LESS THAN TWO PERCENT.  That means you get to pull the arm of the slot ONE TIME to even have a CHANCE to hit the jackpot.   Let’s just say the odds are not in your favor.  So why not choose a game with less chance and more control?

I’ve been to Vegas a few times, but gambling isn’t a rush like it is for other people.  I don’t mind betting, but only on things that I have some element of control over:  Like pool.  The only true element of chance in a game of pool occurs on the break.  After that, the skill of each player determines the outcome, not the random “lie” of the balls. The moment a great pool player gets their turn, the game is essentially over.  Have you ever seen a tournament on TV where one of the players shoots one time…in FIVE GAMES?  That’s what I’m talking about.  Great players visualize the sequence in which they are going to pocket the balls before they even take their first shot.  They know how to strike the cue ball in order to make it sit exactly where they want it to make the next shot.  Great players OWN the table in a way that reduces or eliminates randomness.  I was never close to “professional”, but had no problem throwing a $5 bill on the table before the break.  If I lost, it was either MY fault or my opponent happened to be better in one game.   

Online debates about the future or marketing are taking place daily.  How-to posts about creating the best content for acquiring attention, building prospect lists, executing follow-up systems, and expanding networks are bombarding newsfeeds every 3 seconds.  The question to ask is this:  Who’s REALLY in control of the game, you or the HOUSE, with the house being the customer?  That’s who you’re rolling the dice in hopes of attracting, right?

How many times can you afford to crap out?

Marketing and Sales: DNA Integration

DNA IntegrationWho says sales and marketing can’t work together?

Marketers have long been charged with the goal of getting the attention of potential buyers so sales teams can generate revenue.  Since many people they target have often had little or no previous interaction with a brand, the volume/humor/content/sex appeal/celebrity status has to be ultimately memorable. When it’s not, it’s game over.  You lose.  The sales rep never gets a shot.

What if marketers took ACTUAL insights about CURRENT customers from the sales reps who work with them?  In other words, marketing specialists create content to help deepen front-line relationships between representatives and existing customers in a way that stimulates INTRODUCTIONS rather than just attention.

“This all sounds great, but how do we get there?”  “How do we hire and assign marketers to brands, reps and customers based on worldview compatibility?”

It’s not as hard as you may think.  For example, Flipboard sends articles from selected categories sent to the user’s news feed.  Flipboard represents worldview in a nutshell.  Apply this insight to your marketing strategy, and the “chasm” magically disappears.   Here’s how:  Let’s say a rep has honed their client base to the point of optimal compatibility.  Marketing representatives of complementary profiles would then be matched to serve that particular niche or community, regardless of geographic region…No office physical office necessary.  It’s also a role today’s workforce would thrive in.      

Marketing representatives’ impact would be most significant when combining their content marketing expertise with the personal relationship skills of the brand representative.  When woven together, they add value to the lives of all customers in that niche through informing and educating in ways conducive to that particular set of criteria. Customers then tune in to their messages and tune out those of competitors…unless they are given a reason to stop offering their trust and attention.  

If marketing and sales effectively close this chasm, a strong bond should be formed between all parties involved, as well as within and across microcommunities in both branded(company) and sub-branded(representative) networks.   

What do you think?  Feasible or pie-in-the-sky?

Learning To Swim

When do you learn to swim, when it’s sunny or when the flood waters are approaching your second-story windows? Why, then, do you wait for the storm clouds to fill the skies?  Because like most people, you don’t think it will ever be THAT bad.  

There are times when being an optimist is perfectly reasonable, but this isn’t one of them.  Now it’s all about realism. It’s time to open the blinds and take a long, hard look outside.  The Industrial Age is gone.  So are land lines, televisions with tuning dials maxed out at the number “13”, and 8-track tapes.  We are now in the Internet Age, where consumers are armed with more information about not only brands, but also their representatives, than can be printed on a direct-mail newsletter.  Where does all of this information come from?  Transparent sharing by real human beings in and between an infinite number of online communities.  “Dirty little secrets” can’t stay secure forever.  Inside information may be protected legally, but common-knowledge across-the-board “perks”  of most industries will likely not fall in that category.

What happens when the proverbial cat is out of the bag?  How do you explain to customers the REAL reason for calling them repeatedly when they aren’t expecting it?  They’re going to find out.  The legacy generation that has provided a solid income stream for the last three decades probably knows, but they no longer care. They are nearing the end of their buying cycle for your products and services.  Unless they are independently wealthy, the likelihood of them needing more than they already have is slim.  What many fail to realize is that every generation of consumer that follows is going to have access to exponentially more information shared transparently across infinitely more platforms than their Industrial Age elders. No longer are they going to lie down in a sales appointment.  In fact, there won’t be a “sales appointment”.  It will be a “validation meeting”.  They will meet to confirm that you are a real human being, matching your face to that of your online avatar,  then to verify that the solution they quoted on their mobile device has identical features and pricing on your brand’s platform.

Are you prepared to deal with that reality?

Bugatti Veyron For Sales

BugattiIt’s not a typo:   This isn’t a classified ad. Those don’t work like they used to. Nor do a lot of things in the sales world.

Remember when you had to call people, knock on doors and send them direct mail just to get their attention? Of course you do…90% of the people reading this are still doing it every day! Even though they have access to a marketing machine equivalent to a Bugatti Veyron at their fingertips, they still choose to do it the old way. The vehicle is Social Selling.

What’s the point of the cold call in the first place? To get attention and build relationships, of course. Whose time does that involve? Both the caller’s AND the prospect’s. What happens if you can’t come to trust and respect each other in that first interaction? Both the your AND the prospect’s time are wasted. Time has become an even more important resource than currency, especially when you’re trying to build a business in this fast-paced world. Unlike money, you can’t add time to your bank account.

What if you could establish relationships faster than a Bugatti can go from 0-200 mph? How would it benefit your business if you didn’t have to spend hours every day interrupting people, trying to get their attention to give them a message they usually don’t care about hearing?   What if you could instead focus on engaging with communities of other humans that have grown to know, like and trust you before you have even physically MET THEM?  Does anyone else think this is a ridiculous conversation to be having right now? Be honest: How many more people could you reach and attract if you just stopped doing what you have been told to do for decades and started interacting with customers on THEIR terms? Social Selling allows you to make the most of your time AND that of people who have yet to meet you.

By the way, you can’t test drive a Bugatti Veyron. They’re like works of art, specifically fitted to each buyer…like a personal brand is specific to each human being that builds one.  

Coincidentally, authentic versions of each are nearly priceless.

The Opposite Attraction: NLP

cropped-stop-cross.jpgI’ve said a repeatedly that:  “I don’t care if I’m the FIRST person someone thinks of.  In fact, I’d much rather be the second than the first.” The reason is simple: The representative’s name people bring up first when talking about my industry at dinner parties is often the one they’re pissed at. Interestingly enough, this JUST HAPPENED, right at my own breakfast bar.

My wife had friends over the other evening for wine and appetizers.  Out of the blue, one of them started talking about how much junk mail they get from other local brand representatives, and how they get nothing in the mail from my office.  Almost instantly, the other two chimed in and it became a virtual slam-fest.  These women were going off on the old-school marketing  tactics, saying how they would “NEVER” do business with these people.  Meanwhile, I stood there in my kitchen, eating some soup and a sandwich.  Finally, an opportunity came to throw some gasoline on an already blazing flame:  “Do you know that when those prospects call one of those offices, they are told THEY HAVE TO COME IN DURING BUSINESS HOURS to be taken care of???”  I thought the roof was going to blow off the house!  But it was true. This is how some representatives STILL thrust their “this how we’ve always done it” mentality on people.  What this impromptu conversation made me wonder was:  “How can I tap into this incredible negative energy and use it to build something amazing?”  That’s when I thought back to Anthony Robbins’ “Unlimited Power” CD I keep in my car for road trips.  It’s in that content  where I first learned the term “Neurolinguistic Programming.”  NLP is the perfect way to advertise and market the opposite attraction.

When people go on a diet, do they stop eating entirely?  No.  When they start a workout program, do they go to the gym for three hours 7 days a week after being sedentary for 5 years?  Of course not.  Dieting and exercise are are two cases where doing the exact opposite of what you HAD been doing simply doesn’t work.   Marketing, namely how consumers REACT to certain strategies, is an example of how customers CAN be rewarded for engaging in the exact opposite behavior when confronted with certain stimuli.  In this case, those stimuli are traditional interruption strategies.  Expose and build upon the frustration people like my wife’s friends were demonstrating about the other local brand representatives, then give them an easy-to-adopt opposite alternative that allows them to regain control over their time and attention.

Few things in the world are absolute, which is why gray areas exist.  One exception to this is time.  There are ABSOLUTELY 24 hours in a day…no more, no less.  What people choose to do with every second of every hour depends on their personal values.  I argue that most people value spending time with others and/or doing things that matter most.  They would also prefer in those moments that everything else:  distractions, annoyances, inconveniences, surprises, etc, would just go away.  Do-Not-Solicit/Do-Not-Call, DVR’s, Opt-outs, and anti-SPAM regulations are just a few indications that customers want uninterrupted control of their time. What many have yet to understand, however, is that there are increasing numbers of professional service providers out there TODAY who will allow them to reject the traditional strategies and actually encounter remarkably superior levels of service by doing the exact opposite of what they are accustomed.

When customers begin diverting their attention and revenue the opposite direction, it will accelerate change across entire industries.